3 Strategies to Get Your Social in Shape

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TL;DR: From personal trainers to yogis and nutritionists, the health and wellness movement has exploded on social media. The social health movement has given rise to the fitness influencer, and for some, fitness empires. There’s plenty of tactics your vertical can learn from these social media stars.

Each year brings new fitness trends and nutrition fads, but one thing is certain: The social health and wellness movement is here to stay. A few fitness influencers or “fitfluencers” have stepped out and above the rest, creating fitness empires, all thanks to social media.

1. Differentiation:

Many fitfluencers came to fame by documenting what they love: training, clean-eating, yoga, and so forth. The women behind the multi-million-dollar lifestyle brand Tone It Up, Karena Dawn and Katrina Scott, got their business idea when they met at the local gym and found friendship in accountability. While traditional franchises focused on extreme weight loss circulated on television, Dawn and Scott created low-budget workout videos down at the beach. They joked, they messed up, and they had fun.

Body-positive yogi Jessamyn Stanley began her career transitioning her personal Instagram to sharing yoga poses with captions that got right to the heart of it: issues with weight in society; struggles and success within yoga. She is candid and relatable, and fans flock to her for more. Now a published author, host of a podcast and a partner of U by Kotex, this yogi distinguished herself with authenticity.

What businesses can learn: Find ways to differentiate yourself from the competition. Don’t skimp on research and data — strategic insights from this information can offer the perfect nugget you need to step aside and above your competitors.

2. Listen + Engage with Your Audience

Ensure you take the time to respond and really listen to what your audience is saying. Using data that’s already available will help you answer what your audience may be lacking and how to stand out from the competition. Your audience may just hold the key to your success.

Fitness instructor, mother and “real-food enthusiast,” Jeanette Ogden is the founder of the blog Shut the Kale Up. Beginning her journey into the health world with recipes, fitness tips and products she loves, she now boasts more than 254,000 Instagram followers and strong partnerships with health brands.

Ogden found her audience with her transparent style: She is the queen of Instagram Story talks and responds to many comments, developing a huge following across platforms by fans and fitfluencers alike.

Kayla Itsines, an Australian fitness trainer, began her social journey by housing her clients’ transformation photos on Instagram. As the account gained traction, followers asked for training sessions and tips, which resulted in Itsines’ Bikini Body Guides.

She’s amassed millions of followers, the most dedicated of which use the hashtag #KaylasArmy. Each time her audience calls for something new, Itsines listens. Itsines launched the Sweat app after followers requested additional types of training and something digital they could bring to the gym. It became the most downloaded fitness app on iOS and Google Play and raked in $17 million in revenue.

What businesses can learn: This isn’t the first success story of audience-led account planning. Ensure you take the time to respond and really listen to what your audience is saying. Using data that’s already available will help you answer what your audience may be lacking and how to stand out from the competition. Your audience may just hold the key to your success.

3. Capitalize on Social

Social media helped these women become the stars they are today, but taking the experience off social created a further sense of community and experience for the fans. Between book deals and fitness tours, people fly around the world to be a part of Itsines’ Sweat Tour and the Tone It Up Tour. These fitfluencers maximized on the offline experience by capturing content, building FOMO (fear of missing out), and deepening relationships. By taking their business offline, they helped build a stronger community online.

What businesses can learn: Know the social platforms your brand is on inside and out. If it benefits your brand to go offline, strategize smart ways to capture content and make it social. Social media has allowed audiences behind the scenes like never before, so share company stories, insights on how things are made and the people behind the brand to gain trust and include your audience.

Succeeding on social is hard work, but absolutely possible for your brand. Stay up-to-date on the most recent social trends, build a great strategy keeping in mind some of these tips, and you’re headed in the right direction. If you need some help on the way, give us a shout.

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